Teachers Embracing Technology in the Classroom

By Kim Jones, CEO of Curriki

PBS LearningMedia has released a most interesting survey of pre-K-12 teachers on the role of technology in the classroom. Curriki is partnered with NewsHour Extra from PBS, the parent of PBS Learning Media, which is a great destination for tens of thousands of classroom-ready digital resources.

It’s clear from this recently completed survey that teachers are embracing various technologies and want to bring more technology into the classroom to enhance learning experiences and to increase the motivation of their students. However, limited budget for technology adoption is the biggest barrier, according to 63 percent of the teachers surveyed.

The digital technologies most employed by teachers include websites, images from online sources, and online games. The top reasons for the use of technology are to enhance student motivation, to reinforce and expand on the content being covered, and to promote a variety of learning styles.

Computers are widely available, but the level of technology is not adequate. As one example, interactive whiteboards are available to about 60% of teachers, but that means 2 out of 5 don’t have access to this very useful technology.

Rob Lippincott, Sr. Vice President, PBS Education stated “It’s clear most teachers are embracing technology and need more resources, and PBS is committed to offering innovative tools and resources to support learning in classrooms across America.” The PBS Learning Media digital resource site was recently launched and contains tens of thousands of assets, including content from PBS programs such as Nova, Frontline, American Experience, and Sid the Science Kid.

Curriki, of course, is all about the promotion of digital technologies and open educational resources to support teachers in employing a wide variety of learning modalities. We are happy to be collaborating with PBS to promote digital learning.

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3 responses to “Teachers Embracing Technology in the Classroom

  1. I have already contributed a resource “Visual Math”. Review is pending for a long time. Please let me know how more time will take to Review it now.
    See URL: http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_CK49/VisualMath
    Thanks.
    Chandra Parmar

  2. While technology is lacking in many schools, teachers also lack a knowledge of technology. Schools of education need to add more courses in how to use various forms of technology, not to nail down a specific program or skill, but to teach their student how to acquire the ability to be comfortable with new technology.

    Teaching specific software is not a good use of a college education. What is needed is to expose students to as many packages and applications as possible so they can approach new ones with confidence. Computer literacy is imperative for everyone, but teachers need to be comfortable with technology so they can mentor and teach their students.

    Schools investing in technology is problematic at best. Technology is outdated almost before it is installed. Administrators are leery of technology investments for this very reason. Technology is a difficult. I;m not sure what the answer is.

  3. Dear webdeveloper,
    Students are the digital citizens while teachers the digital immigrants. I carried out a survey with my teachers to evaluate teachers’ ICT skills. Although they have been trained in commonly used software, yet they hardly use them regularly. The reason they gave was that ICT activities are not built into the curriculum and the limitations of timetabling.

    In the light of the findings, I have decided to promote co-teaching where teachers can collaborate and assist each other , task based refresher courses and an e-foundation course.But we have to address the real concerns of the teachers and look into curriculum.
    Could anyone share with me the barriers which prevent embedding ICT in teaching and learning?

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