Tag Archives: digital storytelling

Easy Ways to Integrate Educational Technology into the Classroom

By Janet Pinto, Chief Academic Officer, Curriki

Do you know what digital storytelling is? Think of it as a short “film” that uses a combination of still images, video and sound to more effectively tell a story.

Here is a peek at one new resource on Integrating Digital Storytelling in Instruction that helps students and teachers build on 21st century skills and introduce educational technology into the classroom in a fun and engaging way.

We are excited to unveil a number of NEW resources on the topic of educational technology now available on Curriki. Other very useful collections are Internet safety and Digital Citizenship, which covers everything from plagiarism on the web, to digital responsibility and cyber etiquette for all grade levels. To give you an idea of what’s included, here is a middle school teacher’s guide on copyright laws and digital responsibility with content from ww.B4Ucopy.com:

We encourage you to check out more related resources that have been recently added:

  1. Integrating Wikis in the Classroom
  2. Integrating Blogging in the Classroom
  3. Web 2.0 and Social Media for Collaboration
  4. Teaching with Mobile Devices in the Classroom
  5. Keyboarding
  6. Study Skills

Curriki features more than 150 NEW COLLECTIONS. See our collections on social studies and health, language arts, and STEM. Please share these resources with your friends and colleagues!

Highlights from the Repository: Building Communication and Digital Literacy in the Classroom with Digital Storytelling

If you are looking for a project to build your students’ communication and digital literacy skills, why not have them participate in a digital storytelling project?! As this excellent introduction to digital storytelling by Curriki member Robin Surland points out:

Digital storytelling consists of a series of still images or video images, combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. Many times an additional music track is added to invoke emotions.

Once, you’ve reviewed Robin’s excellent backgrounder, you’ll be ready to take a look at the link Curriki member Anne Leftwich posted here that provides in-depth information on how to create a digital story. Thanks Anne!

Need help visualizing the process before you get started? Here’s “How to make a Digital Story” in a nutshell:

  • Determine what personal experience you wish to present in your story. If you need a bit of help selecting a topic, try filling out this worksheet on the seven basic elements of a digital story by Indiana University.
  • Select images that you wish to display in your story. Beyond your own digital photos, Flickr (creative commons licensed images) and OpenStockPhotography are useful places to find images to accompany your narration. Indiana University has a nice template that will help you storyboard your ideas.
  • Draft a 3-5 minute script to accompany your images.
  • Select music (optional). ccMixer and Open Source Audio are two places where you can find large quantities of open music. Make sure that the track you select allows you to share and remix the original music. For example, click on the cc box featured on the left hand side of this audio. You should be directed to this page that tells you exactly what you can and cannot do with the track.
  • Note: If you find this whole copyright thing confusing (i.e., What images and music from the Internet are you allowed to use legally in your digital story?), the Creative Commons website has lots of great advise. The Wanna Work Together video is particularly helpful.
  • Pull it all together! Create a final storyboard that clearly shows how your images, script and music will all fit together. Indiana University has provided a useful template for this.
  • Select which software you are going to use to create your digital story. Here is a list of possibilies. Voicethread is another nice tool for this. To learn how to use Voicethread, watch this YouTube tutorial.
  • Produce your digital story!
  • Share it with others! (The fun part!)
  • Create a digital storytelling assignment for your students and share your lesson plan with others in the Curriki community here.

For more detailed information on digital storytelling, take a look at the Digital Storytelling Cookbook from the Center for Digital Storytelling. Or, take a moment to watch the YouTube video above (created by Stanford’s Teacher Education Program).

Have fun and feel free to share additional digital storytelling resources in the comments section of this post.

Anna Batchelder

Curriki International Consultant

http://www.Curriki.org

 

 

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