Tag Archives: free educational resources

No Child Left Behind being replaced by Every Child Achieves

janetpic_preferred_croppedJanet Pinto, Chief Academic Officer, Curriki

The “Every Child Achieves Act” (ECAA) has passed the U.S. Senate overwhelmingly with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Approval of similar legislation is expected in the House (which has called their bill the Student Success Act). The original ESEA act from 1965 was focused on addressing equity, at a time when civil rights and desegregation were in focus.

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Every Child Achieves Act of 2015
This bill reauthorizes and amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). The bill addresses issues such as accountability and testing requirements, distribution and requirements for grants, fiscal accountability requirements, and the evaluation of teachers. The bill provides states with increased flexibility and responsibility for developing accountability systems, deciding how federally required tests should be weighed, selecting additional measures of student and school performance, and implementing teacher evaluation systems.

ECAA is designed to replace the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act for elementary and secondary education which has been in force since 2002. You can find a summary of the bill here.

There has been much criticism of the extensive – many would say onerous – testing regimes enforced by NCLB, from educators and parents across the U.S. It was felt that the testing requirements were excessive, and took away from time that should be spent in teaching and learning in the classroom, and that the penalties were counter-productive. The American Federation of Teachers has called NCLB a “test-and-punish” system, due to federal sanctions against low-performing schools.

ECAA would relax these testing requirements, and provide more flexibility for schools to allow parents to opt their kids out of tests. Federal sanctions would no longer apply; any such rewards or sanctions would be handled by individual states.
The President of the National Education Association, Lily Eskelsen Garcia, says about the ECAA, “This bill reflects a paradigm shift away from the one-size-fits-all assessments that educators know hurt students, diminish learning, narrow the curriculum and that they fought to change.”

The well-known education activist Diane Ravitch supports the Senate bill because “it draws a close to the punitive methods of NCLB….(and) is an important step forward for children, teachers, and public education. The battle over ‘reform’ now shifts to the states.”

One concern is that the bill would weaken provisions meant to track the progress of students with disabilities, which may account for one in eight of America’s school children.

We’d like to hear your view, what do you think about the new legislation?

Curriki is all in favor of flexible learning models and curricula that adapt to the needs of individual students. This is why we make available to the public for free over 62,000 educational resources, in open source format. These include full courses, lessons and many supplemental materials. With our new website coming on line early next month, it will be even easier to search these materials, and also to contribute materials so that other educators can make use of them.

Easy Ways to Integrate Educational Technology into the Classroom

By Janet Pinto, Chief Academic Officer, Curriki

Do you know what digital storytelling is? Think of it as a short “film” that uses a combination of still images, video and sound to more effectively tell a story.

Here is a peek at one new resource on Integrating Digital Storytelling in Instruction that helps students and teachers build on 21st century skills and introduce educational technology into the classroom in a fun and engaging way.

We are excited to unveil a number of NEW resources on the topic of educational technology now available on Curriki. Other very useful collections are Internet safety and Digital Citizenship, which covers everything from plagiarism on the web, to digital responsibility and cyber etiquette for all grade levels. To give you an idea of what’s included, here is a middle school teacher’s guide on copyright laws and digital responsibility with content from ww.B4Ucopy.com:

We encourage you to check out more related resources that have been recently added:

  1. Integrating Wikis in the Classroom
  2. Integrating Blogging in the Classroom
  3. Web 2.0 and Social Media for Collaboration
  4. Teaching with Mobile Devices in the Classroom
  5. Keyboarding
  6. Study Skills

Curriki features more than 150 NEW COLLECTIONS. See our collections on social studies and health, language arts, and STEM. Please share these resources with your friends and colleagues!

Spread the Word: Free Educational Resources

[tweetmeme]Spreading the word about Curriki is as easy as copy and paste!

Want to share Curriki with other teachers, principals, and education decision-makers? Visit our Spread the Word Collection to find a wealth of pre-written emails, Power Points, case studies, and more that will help you share the gift of over 32,000 free and open education resources with those you care about most!

To start, why not send the email below to a friend?!

Your Pal,

@Curriki

Subject: FREE Teaching Resources for Your Classroom

Dear Educator,

I am writing to tell you about www.Curriki.org–a website for teachers that includes free access to over 32,000 K-12 high quality lessons, units, assessments and multimedia learning objects. All of the resources on Curriki are contributed by teachers, universities, publishers and education professional development organizations from around the world. Furthermore, content is reviewed by subject-area experts and members to ensure quality.

To start browsing Curriki resources by subject, click here. You can also use the advanced search option to look for resources for specific grades, languages, learning styles, etc. So that you can get a sense of what Curriki has to offer, here a few highlights from the collection:

For Elementary School teachers

For Middle School teachers:

For High School Teachers

Similar to an iTunes playlist, Curriki allows you build your own curriculum by assembling resources that work for your classroom into a collection. You can also upload material you’ve created yourself to add to your collections and share with others easily. To learn how to do this, click here. Or, visit the Curriki help collections to access a number of tutorials on how to use and take advantage of the content on Curriki.

The best way to start using Curriki is to join (for free) and to start browsing through the collections!

Sincerely,

INSERT YOUR NAME

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